Learn more about the Dreidel

Learn more about the Dreidel – Dreidels are especially popular during the eight-day Jewish festival of Hanukkah. Even though they may seem like novelty items for children, dreidels have a rich and interesting history. #Dreidel #Dreidels

Learn more about the Dreidel

Both Hanukkah and Christmas, while joyous celebrations, are laced with solemnity. The Second Jewish Temple was desecrated by Greek-Syrians, who had erected an altar to Zeus and sacrificed pigs within its sacred walls. At this point in time, Jews had to practice their faith in secret, reading the Torah underground and using dreidels to simulate games and confuse Greek soldiers. However, the Jews, led by a small group of rebels known as the Maccabees, persevered, marking the joy of Hanukkah for years to come.

Learn more about the Dreidel - Dreidels are especially popular during the eight-day Jewish festival of Hanukkah. Even though they may seem like novelty items for children, dreidels have a rich and interesting history. #Dreidel #Dreidels

Dreidels are especially popular during the eight-day Jewish festival of Hanukkah. Even though they may seem like novelty items for children, dreidels have a rich and interesting history. In ancient times, Greek Syrians infiltrated areas where many practicing Jews resided. Over time, the Greek Syrians became more oppressive and tried to convert the Jewish people to their pagan beliefs. However, their efforts were not very successful. As a result, the Greek Syrians established laws that outlawed ritual commandments and the study of the Torah.

Torah

Dreidel Song

Well
I have a little dreidel
I made it out of clay
And when it’s dry and ready
Then, dreidel I shall play.

Oh, dreidel, dreidel
I made it out of clay
And when it’s dry and ready
Then, dreidel I will play.

It has a lovely body
With legs so short and thin
And when it gets all tired
It drops and I will win.

Resing Oh …

My dreidel is so…

Fool the Greeks

It is widely believed that Jewish people used dreidels to fool the Greeks into thinking they were just playing a game. Instead, rolls of the dreidel corresponded to numerical equivalents that could represent elements of the Jewish faith, according to My Jewish Learning. Others say the dreidel was a distraction. Children of Israel would learn the Torah in outlying areas and forests. When Greek patrols were nearby, the children would hide their texts and take out dreidels instead, according to Chabad.org.

Letters on the Dreidel

Today it’s a token of the Hanukkah miracle. In Israel, the letters upon the dreidel are Nun, Gimel, Hay, and Pay, which each letter stands for the first letter of each word in the Hebrew statement “Neis gadol hayah sham.” In which that stands for the Hebrew equivalent of “A great miracle happened here.” That statement refers to the defeat of the Syrian army and the rededication of the Temple.

Celebrants play games with this German-based spinning top, and giving to charity is encouraged. Hanukkah is one of the few times of the year when rabbis permit games of chance.

What else can be said?

If you know of anything else that can be added, feel free to share below in the comments.

Article Compliments of MetroCreative. TF17C586 & TF16C652

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