Navajo Indian Code Talkers Henry Bake and George Kirk, December 1943 U.S. Marine Corps, Department of the Navy, Department of Defense

National Navajo Code Talkers Day

National Navajo Code Talkers Day – day honoring those who served during war time.

A day celebrating those code talkers on August 14. This honoring day has been celebrated since 1982. Also known as National Navaho Code Talkers Day.

Navajo Indian Code Talkers Henry Bake and George Kirk, December 1943  U.S. Marine Corps, Department of the Navy, Department of Defense (National Navajo Code Talkers Day)
Navajo Indian Code Talkers Henry Bake and George Kirk, December 1943 U.S. Marine Corps, | Photo credit: Department of the Navy, Department of Defense

A code talker was a person employed by the military during wartime to utilize a little-known language as a means of secret communication.

WikiPedia

During World War II, it was important to have people to translate code. Cipher machines, couldn’t code them correctly. So they had to use real people for that.

Japanese were adept at code-breaking, because many knew English well—because many even had been educated in the United States. Ultimately, the Navajo Code Talkers were the answer.

By August 1942, most of the Code Talkers went to Guadalcanal. That is where the code first took place in battle. By, 1943, there was around 200 of them used. Around 421 were trained overall.

The Navajo Code Talkers served in all six Marine divisions in the Pacific. There missions were classified until 1968.

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