The Great Smoky Mountain National Park Affected by the Government Shutdown

The Great Smoky Mountain National Park Affected by the Government Shutdown – This could put a damper into your vacation for visiting the Smoky Mountains.

The Great Smoky Mountain National Park Affected by the Government Shutdown

The Great Smoky Mountain National Park was running on emergency funds, but those ran out at 4:30 p.m. on New Years Day. This shutdown also involves park employees being paid. (With January 2, 2019, the 12th day of the shutdown).

The Great Smoky Mountain National Park Affected by the Government Shutdown - This could put a damper into your vacation for visiting the Smoky Mountains.

Visitor Centers

All of the park visitor centers will be closed as well.

Bathrooms

Some Parks nationwide have had to close down due to the fact there is no one to clean the restrooms from human waste. That simply means all the restrooms in the park are closed. If you must go to the restroom, you will need to go to a facility outside of the park.

Garbage

Just like the restrooms, garbage has been shutdown too. That means if you need to dispose of anything, you cannot use any park refuse. Any trash must be dropped off in proper trash places outside of the park. Please do not litter in the park due to this shutdown!

Roads

Roads closures are one of the many things you will notice by this government shutdown. The National Park Service was only committed to maintaining three roads in the park: Newfound Gap Road, the Spur between Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg, and a western section of Foothills Parkway.

Rangers

There will be fewer rangers on patrol too. That means they are mostly keeping the minimal staff for things like wildfires, etc.

More …

These shut down and closures should be in effect until the shutdown ends. Not to mention, this applies to most, if not all government parks on this shutdown. Check with your local park before going!

As of Wednesday, January 2, 2019, this federal government shutdown ties with the fourth-longest in history — 12 days. This shutdown is over funding for Trump’s proposed border wall.

The longest government shutdown lasted 21 days back in the mid-1990s — from December 5, 1995, to January 6, 1996 — during a political battle between President Bill Clinton and House Speaker Newt Gingrich over taxes.

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