Flip some tables

Flip some tables – “You wanna live like Jesus? You might have to flip some tables.” #bgbg2

Flip some tables

Flip some tables - “You wanna live like Jesus? You might have to flip some tables.” #bgbg2

“You wanna live like Jesus? You might have to flip some tables.” Flipping a table can seem to be a form of anger, but is there a righteous anger?

In those examples Jesus finds the priest making money off God’s people. They had tables where people can buy a sacrificial lamb and/or currency exchange and the priest were making a huge profit on it and inside the temple no less!

So is there a righteous anger or is anger a sin?

Flipping tables is not explicitly mentioned in the Bible as a specific action or behavior. However, there are instances in which Jesus overturned tables in the temple, which may be what some people are referring to when they use the phrase “flipping tables” in a biblical context.


G390   (Strong)

ἀναστρέφω / anastrepho / an-as-tref’-o

to overturn; also to return; by implication to busy oneself, that is, remain, live: – abide, behave self, have conversation, live, overthrow, pass, return, be used.


In the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke, there is an account of Jesus entering the temple in Jerusalem and driving out the money changers and those who were selling animals for sacrifice. (See the list below)

According to the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus said to them, “It is written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer,’ but you make it a den of robbers.” (Matthew 21:13)

In this account, Jesus did not literally flip tables, but he did overturn the tables of the money changers and the seats of those who were selling doves. This action was a symbolic way of showing his displeasure with the commercialization of the temple and the exploitation of the poor.

He poured out the changers’ money,to kermathe small money – the Nummorum Famulus. In pouring out the money, he showed his contempt of it; he threw it to the ground, to the earth as it was. In overthrowing the tables, he showed his displeasure against those that make religion a matter of worldly gain. Money-changers in the temple are the scandal of it. Note, In reformation, it is good to make thorough work; he drove them all out; and not only threw out the money, but, in overturning the tables, threw out the trade too.

Matthew Henry

It is worth noting that the phrase “flipping tables” is a modern colloquialism and does not appear in any English translations of the Bible.

Righteous Anger

Righteous anger in the Bible refers to the anger that is expressed or exhibited in a manner that is consistent with God’s character and will. In the Bible, there are several instances where righteous anger is mentioned, and it is often associated with God’s response to sin and injustice.

For example, in the Old Testament, God expresses his righteous anger towards the Israelites for their disobedience and idolatry. In the book of Exodus, after Moses descends from Mount Sinai and sees the Israelites worshipping a golden calf, God tells Moses, “Now let me alone, so that my wrath may burn hot against them and I may consume them” (Exodus 32:10).

In the New Testament, Jesus displays righteous anger towards the money changers and merchants in the temple who were taking advantage of people by charging exorbitant prices for sacrificial animals and currency exchange. Jesus overturned their tables and said, “It is written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer,’ but you make it a den of robbers” (Matthew 21:13).

The Bible teaches that while anger itself is not a sin, it can lead to sin if it is not expressed in a righteous manner. In Ephesians 4:26-27, the apostle Paul writes, “Be angry but do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger, and do not make room for the devil.” In other words, anger can be a natural and appropriate response to sin and injustice, but it must be tempered by love and expressed in a way that is consistent with God’s character and will.

Righteous anger in the Bible refers to the anger that is expressed or exhibited in a manner that is consistent with God’s character and will. In the Bible, there are several instances where righteous anger is mentioned, and it is often associated with God’s response to sin and injustice.

For example, in the Old Testament, God expresses his righteous anger towards the Israelites for their disobedience and idolatry. In the book of Exodus, after Moses descends from Mount Sinai and sees the Israelites worshipping a golden calf, God tells Moses, “Now let me alone, so that my wrath may burn hot against them and I may consume them” (Exodus 32:10).

In the New Testament, Jesus displays righteous anger towards the money changers and merchants in the temple who were taking advantage of people by charging exorbitant prices for sacrificial animals and currency exchange. Jesus overturned their tables and said, “It is written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer,’ but you make it a den of robbers” (Matthew 21:13).

The Bible teaches that while anger itself is not a sin, it can lead to sin if it is not expressed in a righteous manner. In Ephesians 4:26-27, the apostle Paul writes, “Be angry but do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger, and do not make room for the devil.” In other words, anger can be a natural and appropriate response to sin and injustice, but it must be tempered by love and expressed in a way that is consistent with God’s character and will.

Read about Jesus overturning the tables

  • Matthew 21:12-13
  • Mark 11:15-18
  • Luke 19:45-47
  • John 2:13-16

Subscribe To Courageous Christian Father!


Subscribe

Don’t miss any blog posts! Subscribe today! You can subscribe via WordPress or by entering your email! Thank you!

Follow Courageous Christian Father on WordPress.com

Join 1,612 other subscribers

Don’t forget to also share blog posts you love on your favorite social media too! Thank you! Sharing is caring!

Follow Steve Sews on Social Media


Below are some examples of blog entries from all the blogs that I do. (Courageous Christian Father, Steve Sews Stuff, and SteveZ DesignZ). 

Loading RSS Feed

Recent Posts

  • The Boy Scouts of America’s National Day of Prayer Patch
    The Boy Scouts of America’s National Day of Prayer Patch — The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) has long been an organization that encourages its members to grow in their faith and contribute positively to their communities. In line with this tradition, the BSA is offering a unique opportunity for Scouts to engage in a meaningful observance of the National Day of Prayer on May 2, 2024.
  • Remembering Gabe Patillo: A Pillar of Faith and Talent
    Remembering Gabe Patillo: A Pillar of Faith and Talent — It is with a heavy heart that we share the news of the passing of Gabe Patillo (Gabe Real), a man whose life was a testament to faith, talent, and the power of community. Gabe, known for his vibrant presence in TobyMac’s Diverse City band, left this world on April 12th, 2024, after a valiant battle with cancer¹². #GabeReal #GabePatillo
  • Hope Media Group
    Hope Media Group: A Beacon of Faith and Hope in the Airwaves which stands as a testament to the power of faith-based media in touching lives and spreading messages of hope and inspiration. With a diverse array of radio stations under its umbrella, Hope Media Group reaches a wide audience, offering a mix of music, ministry, and community engagement.
  • Exploring the Tithe.ly Church App: A Comprehensive Guide
    Exploring the Tithe.ly Church App: A Comprehensive Guide — In the digital age, churches are increasingly turning to technology to streamline their operations and engage with their congregations. One such innovation that has gained popularity among religious organizations is the Tithe.ly Church App. This platform is designed to cater to the unique needs of churches, providing a suite of tools that facilitate giving, management, and community engagement.
  • Libby App Flower Explosion
    Libby App Flower Explosion — In the digital age, where apps and e-books have transformed the way we read, the Libby App stands out with a feature that adds a touch of whimsy to the otherwise mundane task of returning borrowed books. This feature is the delightful ‘flower tap’ that occurs when a user returns a title early.

Thank You For Reading Courageous Christian Father!


Thank you for reading. Please feel free to share and like this blog post.

About the Author

Author: Steve Patterson

A Christian Blogger that enjoys blogging about the Bible, Theology, God, Jesus Christ, Christian Music, Family, Cats, Odd Holidays, sewing and much more. I have been blogging since 2004, however, I have been blogging on Courageous Christian Father since 2012. I enjoy listening to Christian Music. I am married with 1 daughter, 2 step-sons and a step daughter.

Feel free to share your comment! Thank you!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.